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Marxist Theory of Revolution
Marxism.ca Topic Index

  1. The Civil War in France
    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 1871
    Written by Karl Marx as an address to the General Council of the International, with the aim of distributing to workers of all countries a clear understanding of the character and world-wide significance of the heroic struggle of the Paris Communards of 1871 and their historical experience to learn from.
  2. Critique of the Gotha Programme
    Resource Type: Article
    Published: 1875
    Karl Marx's criticisms of the programme adopted by congress to unite the two German socialist parties in 1875.
  3. The Death of the State in Marx and Engels
    Resource Type: Article
    Published: 1970
    Surveys the thinking of Marx and Engels on the 'dying-away' of the state in socialist (communist) society.
  4. Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution
    Volume I: State and Bureaucracy

    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 1977
    A wide-ranging and thorough exposition of Marx's views on democracy.
  5. Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution
    Volume II: The Politics of Social Classes

    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 1978
    Draper ranges through the development of the thought of Marx and Engels on the role of classes in society.
  6. Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution
    Volume III: The Dictatorship of the Proletariat

    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 1986
    Hal Draper examines how Marx and Marxism dealt with the issue of dictatorship in relation to the revolutionary use of force and repression, particularly as this debate has centered on the use of the term "dictatorship of the proletariat." Draper strips away the layers of misinterpretation and misinformation that have accumulated over the years to show what Marx and Engels themselves meant by the term.
  7. Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution
    Volume IV: Critique of Other Socialisms

    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 1990
    Much of Karl Marx's most important work came out of his critique of other thinkers, including many socialists who differed significantly in their conceptions of socialism. Draper looks at these critiques to illuminate what Marx's socialism was, as well as what it was not.
  8. Left Communist Groups & Websites
    Resource Type: Website
    A list of left communist websites and groups.
  9. Libertarian Socialist Groups & Websites in the Connexions Directory
    Resource Type: Website
    A list of libertarian socialist websites and groups.
  10. Marxist Groups & Websites
    Resource Type: Website
    A list of Marxist websites and groups.
  11. The Principle of Self-Emancipation in Marx and Engels
    Resource Type: Article
    Published: 1971
    For Marx and Engels, there was a direct relationship between the revolutionary (literally subversive) nature of their socialism and the principle of emancipation-from-below, the principle that, as Engels wrote, "there is no concern for ... gracious patronage from above."
    Marxism, as the theory and practice of the proletarian revolution, therefore also had to be the theory and practice of the self-emancipation of the proletariat. Its essential originality flows from this source.
  12. Radical Socialist Groups & Websites
    Resource Type: Website
    A list of radical socialist websites and groups.
  13. The Rosa Luxemburg Reader
    Resource Type: Book
    Published: 2004
    A definitive one-volume collection of Luxemburg's writings.
  14. The Two Souls of Socialism
    Socialism from Above vs. Socialism from Below

    Resource Type: Article
    Published: 1970
    It was Marx who finally brought the two ideas of Socialism and Democracy together, because he developed a theory which made the synthesis possible for the first time. The heart of the theory is this proposition: that there is a social majority which has the interest and motivation to change the system, and that the aim of socialism can be the education and mobilization of this mass-majority. This is the exploited class, the working class, from which comes the eventual motive-force of revolution. Hence a socialism-from-below is possible, on the basis of a theory which sees the revolutionary potentialities in the broad masses, even if they seem backward at a given time and place. Marxism came into being, in self-conscious struggle against the advocates of the Educational Dictatorship, the Savior-Dictators, the revolutionary elitists, the communist authoritarians, as well as the philanthropic dogooders and bourgeois liberals.



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